Miscellaneous LRS documents

 

Replica set built by Tom Hoeppe DJ5RE

Many thanks to Colin Wright GM4HWO who forwarded this article which was received at the Museum of Communication (MoC) in Burntisland from German amateur Tom Höppe DJ5RE. It relates to the late Harry Matthews who was the first curator of the MoC collection when it was located at Edinburgh University.

As mentioned later, Tom's DJ5RE entry in QRZ.com contains more on his work with historic radios

and a photo of him with his collection of them..

Pete GM4BYF notes that this incident is mentioned in Spycatcher by Oreste Pinto (1952).

Former LRS member, Mike GM3PAK,  has unearthed this letter:

.........................................................................................................................................................................

Letter to the RadCom Editor:       Distasteful VHF Contest Practice

From: GM3TFY, GM3SRV, GM3RXZ, GM3OWU, GM6SR, GM3OWI, GM4NC, GM3UM, GM3RVL, GM3LAV, GM3PSP, GM3VTH, GM8BJF.

It has become common practice in recent years for English operators to cross the border into Scotland in order to operate schedules on VHF from " rare" Scottish counties. Such expeditions are usually heralded by much pre-publicity to enable a full operating programme to be filled. These stations generally operate for several days or more, and arrange the end of their expedition to coincide with a VHF portable contest. Indeed, most even have the audacity to emphasize their intention to operate during a contest. We, the undersigned resident Scottish VHF operators, consider that it is contrary to the spirit of a contest for portable stations to advertise their presence in an area, either in print or by arranging to operate schedules during the days prior to a contest.

RADIO COMMUNICATION, JULY, 1969, p.491

.............................................................................................................................................................................

This document was provided by Tom Simpson GM3BCD - SK, who was licensed shortly after being demobbed from the Royal Signals at the end of WWII.

General requirements: British Nationality and "two recent references as to character", City & Guilds Radio Amateurs' Examiination pass certificate and Post Office 12 wpm Morse Code test pass certificate.  

In an appendix A, not shown here, was a list of qualifications exempting former-military applicants from technical and morse exams, following discussions between the Post Master General and the Radio Society of Great Britain.

Among the operating conditions required were:

- The use of "spark" sending apparatus is specifically forbidden. 

- Where crystal control is not used, a frequency meter with an accuracy of "not less than +/- 0.1%  must be used.

- No sending period shall exceed 10 consecutive minutes.

- A log book "of approved type (not loose-leaf)" shall be kept, and every entry initialled by the operator.

- Gramophone records may be played but only one, of duration no longer than 10 minutes, in any given day.

- Advertising, broadcast or social / political content is "expressly prohibited".

- The aerial height shall not exceed 50ft agl if situated within half a mile of the boundary of an aerodrome.   

- No direct connexion shall be made between the electricity supply mains and the aerial. 

The LRS was contacted in March 2019 by Anne Northridge of Edinburgh, the daughter of the late Colonel A. Noel Atkinson, RAMC, of Cultra, County Down, who operated as VU2FA in India prior to WWII. She kindly provided the following information, photographs and QSL card which we hope you find interesting:

Shack of VU2FA in Kasauli, India in 1938

(All that to provide 20W of AM on 20 metres, but capable of working the world with a rhombic antenna)!